Tag Archives: Chair Entertainment

Surveys only tell half the story

Frank N. Magid’s recent survey on gamers’ awareness of downloadable content is just another sign of a half-formed survey that tells only one side of the story. Not a surprise, since most focus tests use narrow techniques to answer specific questions. But the story on IGN and Edge explain it’s asking the wrong people playing the wrong systems. Most of the gamers surveyed were playing PS2 and Wii games. In the vernacular, “well, duh.”

DLC games have been booming since Microsoft introduced the console’s Xbox Live marketplace. Entire studios such as Chair have based their total focus on DLC, resulting in games such as the smart Undertow and the retro Shadow Complex. EA put Battlefield 1943 entirely on DLC, trimming out a single-player campaign and focusing entirely on multiplayer.

Analysts point to Rockstar’s Grand Theft Auto IV DLC as examples of how DLC doesn’t work, at least from a pure financial standpoint–Both The Damned and the Lost and The Ballad of Gay Tony didn’t make nearly as much as investors or analysts had hoped they would–but these were Rockstar’s first big attempts at substantial DLC, and while not homers, they certainly got to second base.

I swear, I’m going to conduct my own surveys, each one asking questions like, “Do you think Halo is awesome?” and I’ll make sure to ask only PlayStation 3 users. I’ll ask Nintendo fans “do they love that the Wii is in first place in the console race for the first time since the Super NES?” And then ask Bill Gates, “Have you ever played WOW or LittleBigPLanet?” just for fun. One last question will be aimed at young moms who just bought the Wii to workout; it will be, “How hardcore is Gear of War on a scale of 1 to 17?” Sounds scientific enough for me.

Leave a comment

Filed under Video Games

What’s wrong with the VGAs

When Zach Braff (Scrubs) stepped on stage at the VGAs Saturday night, his face said it all. Escorted on stage by a model dressed as valkyrie warrior (or something), Braff sized up the tall vixen at his side, feigned fright, then appeared on the verge of laughter. He looked embarrassed. To begin his speech, he yelled, “Hello, fellow nerds!”

Last night as I watched the VGAs, a landslide of feelings poured across me, and like Braff, one of those feelings was embarrassment. I felt pride, happiness, and angst, too. But it’s the former emotion that raised my hackles. I was embarrassed by the very tall model having to wear those stupid get-ups. (She never spoke, but she certainly gave Braff a look.) I was embarrassed by the mention of the phrase “balls” more than a half dozen times, courtesy of Jake Gyllenhaal’s game of the year monologue and Joel McHale’s catchy little mid-show appearance. And I was angered by Hollywood’s general sense of embarrassment at appearing on the VGAs, while talented and hardworking designers and producers got on stage, unfolded their acceptance speeches, and bravely flashed their souls in front of millions of people.

Naughty Dog's Amy Hennig receives the game of the year award at the VGAs (AP).

The Video Game Awards (VGAs), the closest thing the video game industry has to Hollywood’s Oscars, still has a long way to go before it really makes sense of the videogame industry–and before it’s taken seriously by the Hollywood stars that line its runways. What I saw last night was a flashier, better produced, and certainly more star-studded show than ever before (with fewer gaffes, to be fair), but I still got the sense that, from a show about video games, video games are still very much Hollywood’s nerdy little cousin–and they still haven’t found their place on TV.

I wonder, is it possible to air a video game show without the constant flash of violence, big tits, and an endless array of explosions? The collage of images I saw Saturday night showed little intrinsic value to video games. Perhaps that’s why Braff, along with Olivia Wilde (who was thrown off her short script by calls from the audience), didn’t take it seriously. If there is anything genuine, human, and real about the video game industry, is there is any art, innovation, or brilliance, it wasn’t shown at the VGAs.

There were sparks of human emotion, and these were the few moments where I felt the show succeeded. It’s great, truly great, that Flower won the Best Independent Videogame Award and that Chair Studio won Best Downloadable Game. These weren’t even categories a few years ago. One of the most genuine acceptance speeches I saw all night was from the Flower team, where they briefly explained the absurdity of pitching a game about emotions and blossoming to Sony, and ended by asking all of the millions of laid off game makers to join them in indie development.

Naughty Dog creative director Amy Hennig gave a heartfelt acceptance speech, and because I have spent many hours talking with Amy about games, I could tell she delivered a genuine heartfelt speech that didn’t fit any mold or formula. I am so happy for her and her team. They fully deserve all the recognition they get.

It was great to see the Assassin’s Creed II team receive their award for best action-adventure game. The Ubisoft Montreal team spoke in both English and in French on stage, didn’t ham it up and, for anyone paying attention to the shift in talent traveling to Canada, represent some of our Northern neighbor’s growing top talent.

Perhaps the biggest win of the night was the best studio award. The guys from Rocksteady, basically an unknown English studio whose claim to fame was the totally ignored Urban Chaos: Riot Response, were grateful, excited, and earnest. Their success story is just fantastic, and their game, Batman: Arkham Asylum, is equally fantastic. It perfectly balances high production values and smart writing that shows the writers really get the Batman character and the universe, and an excellent balance of stealth, action, and adventure. Every comic book videogame from now on will have to reach as high as Batman Arkham Asylum from here on out.

When I think of the Oscars, I often remember the collages of movies and actors who have been a part of the industry’s success; the retrospectives about people who made a difference. When the great directors, actors, writers, and special effects technicians who excel at their craft are recognized and rewarded for their achievements, it puts in perspective what the industry has achieved in the past in comparison to the achievements its awarding today. When I saw the VGAs Saturday night, I saw a show that gave no recognition to its past, that gave no award to its founders, that didn’t seem to have a past or a future, just a right-here, right-now orgasm of action, flashing lights and…the Bravery. Yes, I too like action, flashing lights, and a little Snoop Dog in my cultural diet, but when I eat a meal, I don’t just eat steak by itself.

What’s perhaps equally disturbing is that all night I listened to invisible “professional announcers” guide me through the show. There was no guide, no host, no person, who represented the world of videogames to hold my hand, make me laugh, show me the history of the industry, and again, put the awards, and the industry, in perspective. What does it mean to win best shooter of the year? Who won last year? Are their any journalists out there who could be interviewed to put the games in perspective? One easy solution is to have the previous year’s winner present the current year’s award, informing the audience and passing the torch in a way that means something.

There is a reason no real host was called upon last night. That person doesn’t exist. For starters, actors regularly fail at representing the industry because it’s clear they get paid lots of money to act in films, and that they appear on videogame shows for charity or because of a contract agreement (with notable exceptions like Vin Diesel). Second, there is no charming gamer nerd with the savvy to get up on stage and ride the fence between games and film/TV with moxie, perspective, and charm. From the game industry, the closest anyone has come to nailing that perfect blend are Tim Schafer, Will Wright, Cliff “CliffyB” Bleszinski, and Ken Levine. I am sure there are other talented game creators and personalities around who could pull it off.

Perhaps the show could hire better, funnier writers, too. The joke Tony Hawk told about action adventure games created a dreaded void of discomfort afterward. Almost every actor who took the stage was given sub-par lines, and the Tiger Woods jokes were just plain terrible. Stevie Wonder’s appearance was smart and his challenge to developers to create games for the blind and handicapped will be remembered as a highlight of the show. Jack Black’s entertaining skit for mistaking his best game of the year acceptance speech was pure Jack Black–silly, ballsy, and fun. But in all, instead of being helmed by a person, the host-less VGAs were peppered with Hollywood actors who looked out of place, embarrassed, and itching to get off that stage.

In the end, the VGAs represent the video game industry’s struggle for acceptance in the mainstream world in just the same way movies and TV are accepted. The truth is, the video game industry isn’t the same as the movie industry–though with shows like the VGAs, it’s clear the desire to be like Hollywood still burns brightly. And while I understand last night’s show was fully sponsored by Mountain Dew (the night’s biggest message), and it has to make money and attract an audience, the game industry needs better representation than last night’s show. It needs smarter, funnier video game people and less Mike Tyson. It needs fewer embarrassed actors and more genuine ones. It needs better writing that doesn’t rely on mentioning testicles over and over again to show that the industry actually has balls, and it needs to show its rich heritage, interesting origins, and the stories and characters that made it what it is today. And I don’t mean just trotting out Nolan Bushnell again and again (although he is great in his own way), but getting Shigeru Miyamoto out there to give us a sense of where we started and have come. Putting Will Wright out there to share with us his rocket scientist vision of the future of games. Hauling out Jordan Mechner to put the upcoming Prince of Persia movie in perspective–and not just his happiness at its acknowledgement. What about getting Ken Levine on stage to show us his quirky brilliance? Or having David Jaffe up there? That man’s blog is a world of entertainment.

With a better mixture of video game talent, more relevant Hollywood talent (Jake Gyllenhaal, Jack Black = good; Tyson, Jersey Shore = bad), a perspective, and a smart host, the VGAs could really be something worthy of the industry it represents. As it is, the VGAs are just a sideshow in Hollywood’s ongoing carnival.

Check this story for the show’s full list of winners (a lot of news stories out there show incomplete lists).

3 Comments

Filed under Movies, Video Games

E3 2009: Scenes from E3

I’m not sure how many similar shots have been captured (I suspect a lot), but I never have had time to snap shots of E3 before. So this year I grabbed a few.

The biggest bummer was that when I was finally ready to take a shot of the massive Brutal Legend poster, they had already started rolling it down. Sniffle… This little pictorial also includes a few folks I had drinks with Tuesday night.

The Harmonix team behind closed doors at E3 explaining Rock Band: The Beatles' six-part harmonies.

The Harmonix team behind closed doors at E3 explaining Rock Band: The Beatles' three-part harmonies.

Final Fantasy XIII is painted onto the steps of the LA Convention Center. The second day of the show the paint was wet so everyone had to funnel up the escalator to get in. Argh.

Final Fantasy XIII is painted onto the steps of the LA Convention Center. The second day of the show the paint was wet so everyone had to funnel up the escalator to get in. Argh.

Hey look ma, it's Mafia II. It's not Grand Theft Auto V, it's just like a new, prettier Mafia game, with old 50s cars, Sicilian guys, a huge drivable city, and lots of shooting, maiming, and Italian-style mobster missions. Been there!

Hey look ma, it's Mafia II. It's not Grand Theft Auto V, it's just like a new, prettier Mafia game, with old 50s cars, Sicilian guys, a huge drivable city, and lots of shooting, maiming, and Italian-style mobster missions. Been there!

This is the Rabbids' means to getting to the moon. Funny? FUNNY???!!!!

This is the Rabbids' means of getting to the moon. Funny? FUNNY???!!!!

Rock Band, Mass Effect 2, and Final Fantasy XIII all in one shot.

Rock Band, Mass Effect 2, and Final Fantasy XIII all in one shot.

Ms. Tara Bruno, looking fine, Donald Mustard (designer of Shadow Complex designer), and Laura Heeb Mustard (PR queen) laughing it up.

Ms. Tara Bruno, looking fine, Donald Mustard (Shadow Complex designer), and Laura Heeb Mustard (PR queen) laughing it up.

Matt Frary has only one thing to say: That trip to Mexico was GREAT, you F*&^%ing m&^^%$# Fu(*&^er!

Matt Frary has only one thing to say: That trip to Mexico was GREAT, you F*&^%ing m&^^%$# Fu(*&^er!

The Battlefield 1943 at 8:30 am, before the screaming fanboys have arrived.

The Battlefield 1943 booth at 8:30 am, before the screaming fanboys have arrived.

Modern Warfare 2, I'm guess this will win Best of Show from someone.

Modern Warfare 2: Infinity Ward's game will win best game of the show from at least one media outlet.

At day's end, I had to hide behind the trees to block the setting sun. Assassin's Creed II promises to be better than the 8-million-unit-selling Assassin's Creed 1.

At day's end, I had to hide behind the trees to block the setting sun. Assassin's Creed II promises to be better than the 8-million-unit-selling Assassin's Creed 1.

Krato shows us the Power of the PS3. God of War III looked fucking spectacular on screen. A definite, must-have game for the PS3.

Krato shows us the Power of the PS3. God of War III looked fucking spectacular on screen. A definite, must-have game for the PS3.

Leave a comment

Filed under Video Games

E3 2009: Shadow Complex

Chair Entertainment, the Utah studio responsible for Undertow, is in development with Shadow Complex, a 2D shooter designed as an homage to Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, infused with the spirit of GI Joe, and which offers a parallel story to Orson Scott Card’s most recent novel, Empire.

Like Undertow, Chair’s first independent XBLA game, Shadow Complex is an Xbox Live Arcade exclusive DLC title, to be published by Microsoft, slated for a summer release. The side-scrolling shooter is, of course, built upon the Unreal 3 Engine, featuring all of the flashiest tech effects that a console game offers. The lead character wields a wide range of weaponry including the innovative foam gun, which can be used for cover, as a step-ladder to reach higher ground, or as a temporarily paralyzing device stopping enemies cold.

The game also features a grappling hook for scaling walls, jet booster pack, and offers a suite of bad-ass mega-bosses to fight, the first that we saw being a spider mech boss.

“When I grew up, I loved GI Joe,” said Donald Mustard, Shadow Complex’s lead designer. “I loved GI Joe vs Cobra. It was fricken awesome. What I really loved about it as I got older, looking back, was a high tech bad guy versus a more low tech hero. When we initially approached (Orson Scott) Card about the book, that was some of our thinking. How could we create a really realistic GI Joe? Where there really was a high tech bad guy and a lower tech good guy and we made it more adult. Buy who would be that bad guy? The United States. We’d be the only one with enough power realistically, so they we thought about how we could make the US the bad guy and we worked that into out goal.”

Shadow Complex will be shown at this year’s E3 2009 event.

1 Comment

Filed under Video Games